In this Photoshop tutorial, you’ll learn one of the most popular retouching technique that can be used in landscape photography, portrait photography, architecture and more. It’s called dodging and burning. With this technique you selectively choose which areas of your photos should be brighter or darker. When used correctly, you can completely transform your photos. Photographers use this technique to give their landscape photos the dramatic look. You can even use it to contour a person’s face simply by changing the lighting. There’s a lot more you can do with this technique and in this tutorial, you’ll learn how to dodge and burn nondestructively and you’ll also learn how to combine it with another technique called luminosity masking for even better results. So if you’re interested, keep reading to find out how it’s done.

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This week I spent the entire time making some really cool Photoshop actions based on my favorite camera. This here is the Yashica EZ F521. It’s cheap, plasticy, and only 5 megapixels. But the photos that come out of this are really nice. Unlike most other digital lomography cameras which are really just cheap cameras rebranded as something stylish and retro, the Yashica has a nice color characteristic that’s similar to film. I like it so much that I wanted to buy a second one as a backup. But it’s no longer being produced and I can’t find it anyone selling it for a reasonable price. So as a personal project, I created a set of Photoshop actions to emulate everything from this camera; from the film-like color characteristics, to all of the in-camera effects, and even the sharpness and noise pattern. I spent so much time making these Photoshop actions to get them to look at authentic as possible. And I wasn’t even sure if this was something that people wanted, but I figured I might as well make it into a proper product that other people can use  and if people like it, they like it. If not at least it’s something that I’ll still use.

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Luminosity masking – one of my favorite Photoshop techniques. Luminosity masking lets you make a layer visible according to the brightness value of your photo. For example, you can brighten your photo and then apply luminosity masking so that it doesn’t overexpose the areas that are already bright to begin with. You can also apply color grading effects to different tonal areas. You can do HDR tone mapping with it and a lot more.  Luminosity masking is one of the oldest and most useful retouching techniques. I’ve been teaching this since the beginning of my first Photoshop website which was over 12 years ago and I’ve seen others teaching it even earlier – over 15 years ago. But despite it being old, it’s still being used today in pretty much the same way. In this Photoshop tutorial you’ll learn the 2 of the most useful and common methods for luminosity masking. So if you’re ready, let’s get started.

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Today I want to teach you a retouching technique that not a lot of people pay attention to. I’ll be teaching you how to enhance the eyes by enlarging the pupils in Photoshop. The pupil size can apparently make your subject more appealing. In some places like Korea and Japan, it’s quite common to find people buying fake contacts that make their pupils look bigger. There was also a study a long time ago where they showed two sets of photo. They both are the same except that one had the pupils dilated. People prefer the photo with the dilated pupils… and when they’re asked why, they can’t explain it. There are a lot of ways to retouch portraits. Enlarging the pupils is just one of them. But sometimes the smallest part of your photo will have the biggest impact. So if you’re interested, read this Photoshop tutorial and I’ll show you how to dilate the pupils.

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Color grading your photos in Photoshop using the curves and hue/saturation adjustments is doable but sometimes it’s hard to see what’s happening. So I made for you a reference chart that you can import into your photos and it will let you see exactly how your adjustment layers are affecting the tones and colors in your photo. The reference charts are intended for people who already have some experience color grading their photos. It’s not really made for beginners… and I’m not going to be going into too much details about how to use the tone curve. So if this is something that might interest you, keep reading and you’ll see how it works.

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In my previous tutorial, I taught you how to create and use a tone chart in Photoshop. However things are different in Lightroom and we can’t really create the same tone chart. Using the tone curve and color adjustments is quite difficult in Lightroom. So to make things easier, I created for you this chart for Lightroom. You can place your own photo in the chart to use as a reference and then the settings you use here can be saved as a preset and applied to your other photos. But this chart goes a bit further than the tone chart I introduced in my previous video. And instead of just letting you use the tone curve easier, it also has a color chart that makes color adjustments easier as well. This technique is very useful whether you want to color grade a single photo with good control or if you want to create an entire pack of Lightroom presets to share with others. So if you’re interested, keep reading and I’ll show you how it works.

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This week I made for you some pretty interesting Photoshop actions. These actions will generate completely random film-style effects in just one click. You can get effects that look like photographic film, expired Polaroid prints, and even those urban matte effects that you see in a lot of city and architecture photos. These actions are great when you want to experiment and see how your photo will look with different types of film effects.

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A lot of you have shown great interest in my tone chart tutorial and I’m so happy you guys found it useful. So before I start creating other types of videos, I should expand on the tone chart technique and show you guys another one of secret tricks. In this tutorial, you’re going to how to take a bunch of layers and compress them into a single curves adjustment layer. This is a very efficient way of color grading and if you’re interested, keep reading and I’ll show you how it’s done.

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A Youtube user left a comment on my previous video about the Tone Chart saying that he/she tried to make a Photoshop action out of this but it didn’t really work. I think I know what happened but instead of telling you what to do, I just did it for you. I made a Photoshop action that creates the tone chart. It’s free and I think many of you will find it very convenient.
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The tone curve adjustment is seriously powerful tool that lets you create a lot of different photo effects. But it’s also very hard to use. In this tutorial, you’ll learn my secret trick to using the tone curves which makes it easier to use and it’ll give you better results at the same time. I’ve used this technique to create hundreds of Photoshop actions and Lightroom presets and if you’ve ever used my products, you’ll know much I depend on it to keep things minimal and less CPU intensive. Today, I’ll reveal to you my secret trick – the tone chart.

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